3 questions for Federica Morbelli, organiser of Parcours des Mondes

By AMA with Artkhade

Paris, 8 September 2018

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What strategy are you implementing for Parcours des Mondes?

With sixteen editions behind it, Parcours des Mondes has become a leading player in the world of international tribal- and Asian-arts fairs. The legacy of these sixteen editions, all these sold objects, all these encounters, needs to be consolidated by maintaining what has been responsible for the quality of Parcours des Mondes until now: rigour in the selection of exhibitors. What makes a fair special is the diversity of its different stakeholders. In the first place, we address dealers: these are our clients, and they’re the ones we work with for six months in order to construct a rich event. But our audience is made up of art lovers, collectors, with demanding requirements. We need to find a good balance.

What approaches do you follow to strengthen this renown?

First, we wish to promote the heritage aspect of Parcours des Mondes. We’re also focusing on the need to reinvent our communication methods – we’re opening up more to social networks for example. Next, to maintain [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews, Fairs & Shows


4 questions for Pierre Moos, director of Parcours des Mondes

By AMA with Artkhade

Paris, 7 September 2018

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Do you think that the fair, celebrating its 17th birthday this year, has reached maturity? Are you still seeking to enrich it with new perspectives?

I’m very proud of the renown that Parcours des Mondes enjoys today. When we took it over several years ago, the event was going downhill. Over time and with a lot of passion, we’ve worked to give it the face it has today, by selecting participants from the world’s top galleries, which isn’t so easy given that there are very few of them. This might seem paradoxical, but what you need to bear in mind is that there are around sixty tribal-arts galleries worldwide, no more. By way of comparison, if you take any building in the Chelsea district in New York, you’ll find the same number of contemporary-art galleries, if not more. Clearly, we live in a microcosm from which we’re taking the best. This year, we refused about twenty potential participants due to the quality of works – primordial in our eyes – and also due to the fact that the number of galleries admitted to the event cannot be [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, African Art, Interviews, Fairs & Shows


Respecting the Balance

Gilles Picard

Brussels, 23 January 2018

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Like most collectors flocking to BRAFA, Harold t’Kint de Roodenbeke likes the month of January. President of the fair for the sixth consecutive year, he reveals to Artkhade with AMA the key points of the strategy for the Brussels-based fair. Verbatim.

With nearly 25,000 artifacts and works of art, presented by 135 exhibitors, BRAFA is an event not to be missed. Considered one of the top five global art fairs, it takes place in January and is also the fair which sets the pace for the art market. Following the Paris biennale in September, Frieze Masters in October in London and shortly before the Maastricht TEFAF in March, BRAFA is a key date in the diary for all lovers of fine art. A major European event held at the stylish brick and wrought iron Tour & Taxis site, BRAFA signals the return to trading for the year. It is important to keep in mind that on this international stage whilst 30% of traders are Belgian, the bulk of those in attendance come from the other 15 countries represented, from Canada to Japan. The key characteristic of BRAFA [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews, Fairs & Shows


Alex Arthur, Tribal Art and its market

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 13 September 2017

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What are the evolutions and limitations of the tribal-art market? How is it nurtured by the contributions of research and ethnology? Alex Arthur offers us a few indications…

Alexander Arthur is a well-informed collector and a fine connoisseur of tribal arts. For over twenty years, he has been the publishing director of Tribal Art Magazine. In 2009, he also became involved, with Pierre Moos, in the management of Parcours des Mondes.

-You are one of the key protagonists of Parcours des Mondes. How have you seen the fair evolve?

A.A.: I actually participated in the very first Parcours so I remember well how it consisted of only a handful of galleries. But the concept was a good one and it grew rapidly into the world’s premier event. The event grew in quality as has the market overall and Parcours des Mondes has become the annual focal point for many galleries today, a situation that is reflected in the quality of many artworks on show and the number of thematic exhibitions.

-Tell us about vetting at the fair.

A.A.: Like [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews, Fairs & Shows


4 Questions for Pierre Moos

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 12 September 2017

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-You have directed Parcours des Mondes since 2007. How do you view the evolution of the fair and of the tribal-art market?

P.M.: Parcours des Mondes was created in response to a demand from tribal-art dealers. As its name indicates, this fair is an international event, open to all forms of extra-European artistic cultures. For around ten years now, we’ve been working on our communication strategy for the event: we devote 80 % of Parcours des Mondes’ proceeds on expenses relating to press relations, advertising and marketing. This publicity, coupled with that associated to the auction sale of key pieces, helps to raise awareness on tribal art all over the world, and this is positive. Finally, the recent opening up of the fair to the Asian arts proves, if proof were still necessary, the major role of Paris on the global art market. All these elements explain why Parcours is the world’s most important fair in tribal art today… To give you an idea, some dealers who take part in the event produce, in just a few days, three quarters of [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Fairs & Shows, Interviews


3 questions for… Alain de Monbrison

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 3 September 2017

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  • What, in your opinion, is the main asset of the Barbier-Mueller collection?

A.d.M.: First of all, the fact that it’s gathered very coherent sets of objects, as precious as they’re simple. The archaeological bronzes of the Vietnamese Dông Son civilisation comes to mind, but also the African chairs, a legacy of Josef Mueller that Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller took care to add to. It’s also a universal collection which gathers objects from Africa as well as Oceania or Indonesia. Not forgetting its Pre-Columbian art objects which comprise a key collection. It’s also exceptional for the rarity of certain pieces that are listed nowhere else… and for the beauty that unites all the objects.

  • How was Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller a great collector?

A.d.M.: For his eye that was so unique and accurate… and his great erudition. Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller was a cultivated man who left nothing to chance. When he started up a collection, he invested in it entirely. He studied every object, consulted the best ethnologists and historians. He [.../...]

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Tags: Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews, Events


Sophie Makariou: a “new impetus” for Guimet

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 1st September 2017

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Sophie Makariou, president of the Musée National des Arts Asiatiques, takes the mike. An hour on cultural policy, the transmission of knowledge, redeployment of the collections. Between heritage and contemporaneousness…

Her itinerary is impeccable, her character resilient… Studies in classical Arabic at Langues’O, followed by the École du Louvre, a postgraduate diploma in history, then the École du Patrimoine… Sophie Makariou is a woman in a hurry. She’s said to be “difficult”; above all, she’s a hard worker whose cutting intelligence has led her, in the space of a few years, to hold the reins of one of the finest Parisian museums. A heritage curator who directed the department of Islamic arts at the Louvre from 2009 to 2013, she has been president of the Musée National des Arts Asiatiques for four years now. As the new school year starts, making allusions to a “new impetus”, she outlines for us the major areas of her cultural policy.

  • **You were appointed, in August 2013, president of the Musée Guimet. Have the four [.../...]
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Tags: Asian Art, Interviews


Bourgogne Tribal Show 2017

By Artkhade with Gus Adler & Filles

Besanceuil, 14 March 2017

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Jean-François Schmitt is an art-lover and collector. He is a Friend of the musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac and a member of the Cercle Lévi-Strauss.

Anthony Meyer is a dealer, author, and specialist in Pacific and Eskimo ancient arts and traditional cultures. He manages the Meyer Gallery of Oceanic Arts in Paris and is one of the founders of the Bourgogne Tribal Show, along with Laurent Dodier, Bruno Frey, Jacques Lebrat and Bruno Mory.

For its second event, the Bourgogne Tribal Show will take place from 25th to 28th May, 2017. You both took part in the fair’s first event, one as a dealer, one as a collector. Could you share your experiences with us?

Jean-François Schmitt: My abiding memory of the first event is what a pleasure it was to see tribal art in less conventional settings. The atmosphere was very different from the other fairs, far more casual and convivial.

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Its location in the Burgundy region was ideal too, [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Fairs & Shows, Exhibitions, Interviews


A collection spanning several millenia

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 6 September 2016

Christie's

On the occasion of the Parcours des Mondes fair, young collector Inti Ligabue draws up a portrait of one of the broadest Italian art collections, ranging from prehistory to modern paintings via tribal art. An inventory.

*Inti Ligabue, thirty-five years old, was appointed honorary president of the 15th edition of the Parcours des Mondes fair. This year, the event is drawing to Paris 80 international galleries specialising in tribal and Asian arts, from 6 to 11 September. Inti is the son of Giancarlo Ligabue, who passed away in 2015, and who gained renown as an archaeologist, palaeontologist and collector, as well as a political figure and businessman at the head of Gruppo Ligabue, a hundred-year-old family business dealing in food freight and services, present on every continent. This eminent Italian public figure left behind an incomparable legacy, including an extraordinary art collection covering a few thousand years. To carry on this adventure, Inti Ligabue launched, in January [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Fairs & Shows, Interviews


Bryan Reeves, a forward-looking view of London’s tribal-art market

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

London, 27 August 2016

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Bryan Reeves has stood for a certain vision of tribal art and culture ever since he launched the Tribal Perspectives fair in 2007. Since then, the event has grown, changed its name and venue by moving into The Mall Galleries to become Tribal Art London. At the start of September, Art Media Agency with Artkhade went to London, winding through the fair’s alleys, to meet Bryan Reeves.

  • Can you introduce Tribal Art London to us? What is your fair’s angle?

B. R.: I like introducing Tribal Art London as a cultural fair. Our exhibitors cover all fields of tribal art around the globe, and we have a well-developed conference programme, offering debates in fields as wide as culture or ethnography — the aim being to increase understanding of tribal art without contenting ourselves with merely being a strictly commercial fair. Today, the fair is heading to its ninth birthday. When we started, we were no more than a small exhibition with three dealers — “Tribal Perspectives”. We gradually developed the fair, then moved to a fantastic spot, [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Fairs & Shows, Art Market, Interviews