Tribal art under the spotlight at Christie’s

Paris, 15 March 2018

/

On Monday 9 April and Tuesday 10 April 2018, Christie’s Paris is holding two sales starring tribal art from Africa, America and Oceania.

On Monday 9 April, 149 Pre-Columbian art objects from Ilya and Marina Prigogine’s collection will go on sale. A Belgian physicist and chemist of Russian origins, Ilya Prigogine won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1977. He started collecting tribal art in 1960s with his wife, and filled out the collection towards the end of his life.

African, American and Oceanic pieces will be on offer, but the highlight will be the exceptional lot featuring Mexican sculptures. The latter are a unique testimony to Olmec culture and the Chontal and Mezcala tribes that lived in the mountainous regions of Guerrero.

Little remains known about the lives of these peoples, but most of the objects at the sale probably held a ritual function. The sale’s climax will be a set of anthropomorphic figurines dated between 300 and 100 B.C. A talk introducing the collection will also be given on 5 April 2018 by Alex Arthur (Tribal [.../...]

See more

Tags: Pre-Columbian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Art Market


The Dealers speak out

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 15 September 2017

/

They’re the ones who murmur into the ears of collectors. Gallerists play a crucial role in the tribal-art economy. For this special issue, a number of them, each with their own specialities, have agreed to share their feelings on the sector. Confidences.

At auctions, the eclectic nature of the tribal-art market indicates sure growth in the long term, both in terms of the number of lots placed on sale and their proceeds, even if the last three years have seen heavy fluctuations, if not a slight decline. However, by overshadowing the reality of the world of dealers, auction results are only a partial indicator of the health of a sector characterised by deep restructuring. Between a generational shift among collectors, sourcing difficulties, and a complex balance between auction houses and dealers, what does the future hold?

Collectors: a new generation takes the reins? In the eyes of Alain Lecomte from the gallery Abla & Alain Lecomte, specialised in ancient African arts, there’s no doubt about it: the sector is in for a shakeup: “The [.../...]

See more

Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, African Art, Fairs & Shows, Art Market


Tribal art and Archaeology: transactions under pressure

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 4 September 2017

/

Stratospheric-level auctions, overheated prices… The market for archaeological and tribal pieces is booming! We retrace the phenomenon of star status for these highly coveted objects. An issue that we examine by seeing what dealers, collectors and members of the scientific community have to say…

Ever since the start of the 2000s, the tribal-art market has literally exploded, with its turnover jumping up from €13.7 million in 2001 to €92.1 in 2014. Despite this strong growth, tribal art remains a marginal market, which represents only 0.68 % of the global turnover of art auction sales, in other words, 40 times less than the proportion occupied by modern art, according to a report published by Artkhade and Art Analytics in December 2015.

Largely in front, Africa and Oceania leave other geographical zones behind in the shadows. Between 2000 and 2014, these two continents represented 64.8 % of lots offered at auctions and 81 % of the sector’s total sales proceeds. Above all, the market’s growth has been accompanied by a [.../...]

See more

Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Art Market


Barbier-Mueller: four generations of collectors

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 3 September 2017

/

To celebrate the 40th birthday of the Musée Barbier-Mueller, the Biennale Paris is welcoming a selection of 130 works from this Swiss family’s personal collections. An opportunity to retrace a passion and a saga.

For the Barbier-Muellers, collecting is part of the family history… It started off with the grandfather, Josef Mueller, then continued with the mother, Monique, the father, Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller, and today the three sons, Gabriel, Stéphane, Thierry, as well as Diane, one of the granddaughters. Four generations of collectors that the Biennale Paris has chosen to honour through a selection of works from their collection, some of which have never been unveiled to the public. “The idea was to set up a dialogue between major pieces from four generations of collectors with very different tastes by recreating the atmosphere of Josef Mueller’s apartment, where modern paintings stood alongside primitive-art objects,” is the way that Laurence Mattet, director of the Musée Barbier-Mueller in Geneva, puts it. Sculptures and [.../...]

See more

Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Events, Art Market


Bryan Reeves, a forward-looking view of London’s tribal-art market

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

London, 27 August 2016

/

Bryan Reeves has stood for a certain vision of tribal art and culture ever since he launched the Tribal Perspectives fair in 2007. Since then, the event has grown, changed its name and venue by moving into The Mall Galleries to become Tribal Art London. At the start of September, Art Media Agency with Artkhade went to London, winding through the fair’s alleys, to meet Bryan Reeves.

  • Can you introduce Tribal Art London to us? What is your fair’s angle?

B. R.: I like introducing Tribal Art London as a cultural fair. Our exhibitors cover all fields of tribal art around the globe, and we have a well-developed conference programme, offering debates in fields as wide as culture or ethnography — the aim being to increase understanding of tribal art without contenting ourselves with merely being a strictly commercial fair. Today, the fair is heading to its ninth birthday. When we started, we were no more than a small exhibition with three dealers — “Tribal Perspectives”. We gradually developed the fair, then moved to a fantastic spot, [.../...]

See more

Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Fairs & Shows, Art Market, Interviews


Online sales platform Auctionata confirms its leadership

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Berlin, 8 April 2016

Online

On 8 March 2016, the online sales platform Auctionata announced a Gross Merchandise Value of $90 million (€81 million) in 2015, in other words a 165 % leap marking its strengthened leadership in the online auction sector. The company envisages developing new sales formats and increasing broadcasting times for its auctions in 2016.

Auctionata, set up in Berlin in 2012, is based in Berlin, New York and London. The bulk of its turnover comes from Berlin (80%) while New York and London represent 20 % — the house is however strengthening its position in the United States. It ran 249 auctions in 2015. Its progress is attributed to the launch of new processes, allowing sales to be held from two or three different locations. Auctionata holds the online sale record for a 17th century porcelain vase sold for €875,000 ($951,000).

According to Alexander Zacke, chairman and founder of Auctionata: “With 200,000 customers from 199 countries and several distinct yet complementary livestream formats, [.../...]

See more

Tags: Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Art Market


Are we in an art market bubble?

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency
Are

Since the market crash in 2008, the term “bubble”, applied in an economic context, has become part of everyday vocabulary. The analogy of a market growing so big, like a bubble, filled with air only waiting to burst, is almost irresistibly charming. Economic bubbles happen all the time, all over the world.

The most discussed possible bubble in recent years has been the art market. Critics, ranging from economists, journalists to opinionated folk, claim that the art market is a bubble and that when it bursts, it will be ugly. Maybe this talk started exactly the same day the biggest bubble in almost a century started bursting: 15 September 2008. On this day, one of the biggest Wall Street firms, Lehmann Brothers, went bankrupt, signalling the real depth of the crisis the world was about to face. On the other side of the Atlantic, Sotheby’s held a one-man auction, with works from Damien Hirst only commissioned directly from the artist, raising £111 million. This is an almost unbelievable coincidence: one of the most controversial artists [.../...]

See more

Tags: Asian Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Art Market


Everything You Need to Know about the Market for Tribal Art in Seven Numbers

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 30 November 2015

Ouverture

Surveying the tribal art market from 2000 to 2015, a recently released Artkhade and Art Analytics report revealed exceptionally positive results for the category, documenting a growing trend towards multi-million-dollar auction sales and the increasing domination of the market by high-end works.

The study amassed a wide range of data to document tribal art’s growth as a sale category—though it still lags far behind the dominant Modern, Post-War, and Contemporary art segments of the market. Here, we have selected seven key figures from the report’s pages to explore what they tell us about the future of this “niche” market.

  • €92.1 million | Breaking records

The tribal art market witnessed record sales in 2014, achieving €92.1 million from works sold at auction. Demonstrating the upward trajectory of the market, this result well surpassed the €52.8 million sold just one year previous, in 2013, never mind the €13.7 million of tribal art sold in 2001.

  • 2006 | An epic year

The year 2006 stands out [.../...]

See more

Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Aboriginal Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Art Market


Quantifying the art market: a transparent process?

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 17 April 2014,

Quantifying the art market: a transparent process?

In art, a quantitative approach is often given bad press. Those who pursue analyses based on value are often accused of relegating the importance of art works themselves – reducing them to mere financial assets. A number of dealers pretend to ignore the industry’s financial side, placing a stronger emphasis on the aesthetic or emotional aspect of their work. The reality of the market, however, means that financial considerations remain – and are increasingly – a vital component of the art world.

Art has often sought to avoid an association with finance and has, in part, succeeded. A work of art – even one considered to have little financial worth – is capable of attaining a very personal value which a treasury bond will never reach. Yet, in the context of an increasingly liquid market affected by ongoing inflation, information is key; thus, the importance of accurate data sources becomes increasingly important.

In the 1990s, a number of data specialists used the development of the [.../...]

See more

Tags: Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Art Market


From Primitive to Prosperous: the Complicated Rise of Tribal Art

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 10 September 2013

From Primitive to Prosperous: the Complicated Rise of Tribal Art

Tribal Art has witnessed a long and complex evolution, with European art history oscillating wildly in its attitude to the genre. Once referred to pejoratively as ‘primitive art’, tribal art has since been recognised for the important influence it had on the works of Expressionist, Surrealist and Cubist artists. Now, the field is recognised as rich and diverse, with museums, galleries and collectors across the globe placing an important focus on the works of indigenous peoples from Africa, North America and Oceania. Artkhade with Art Media Agency examined the platforms which are specialising in the genre today, looking at the presence of Tribal Art in Galleries, Museums, at auction houses and in dealerships.

A Slow Rise to Success

‘Primitive art’ is now recognised as a dismissive term, connoting an outdated Euro-centric attitude which coincided with the height of imperialism, colonialism, and the exploitation of countries by the West. The title connoted the belief that [.../...]

See more

Tags: Aboriginal Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Art Market, Events, Fairs & Shows